Scoring Panfish and More by Fishing Deep at Punderson Lake in Ohio


Fishing with a bobber and worm is a time-tested way to bag fish, especially panfish. But when the water temperature gets high, fish often move deeper in search of cooler waters.

So fish down low. Tie a sinker to the end of you line, and a small hook (size 8 or 6) a couple feet up. Add a wriggling red worm. Cast gently, let the sinker hit bottom, them tighten your line. Wait for the gentle tugs, then lift straight up. Boom—fish on!

Using this technique at Punderson Lake in Ohio, we scored bluegills, pumpkinseeds, sunfishes, channel catfishes, and yellow bullhead catfishes.

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Catching Striped Bass and Walleye —and a Flathead Catfish— at Fletcher’s Cove

Kosar striped bass 05-2019
This happened—after bouncing 3/4 ounce bucktail-type jigs with trailing sparkling plastic shad and worms (4 to 6 inch) off the bottom with quick snaps of the wrist.

But this also happened, which was utterly unexpected. He weighed 12 to 15 pounds, and took a few minutes to bring to the boat. Young blue catfish came up on the jig-plastic rig too. The 15-pound leader attached to 10-pound line handled these beasts, to my amazement.

Kosar flathead catfish 05-2019

 

Walleye also jumped at the jig (sans plastics), but in early season are best chased with green worms popped on a round jighead (1/2 to 3/4 ounces). Drag it along the bottom on the Virginia side of the river, where the bottom is more gravelly and sandy. (Sorry, no photo!)

Fletcher’s Cove, by the way, is here, and offers rowboats you can rent out.

Review: Fishing Lake Medina in Medina Township, Ohio


This drone video will give you a good sense at the size of Lake Medina. (Directions here.)

My video above will give you a good look at the side of the lake nearest the parking lot. We scored a rock bass here, saw plenty of bluegills and sunfish, along with largemouth bass. And I nabbed a northern pike in a very small branch of Rocky River next to the lake. Others report catching channel catfish, crappie, perch, and walleye.

You do not need a fishing license to fish here. The water is clear, the shored are rocky, and there’s a huge amount of space to shore fish.

Canoes and kayaks can be put in on the northern side of the lake — although it is about a 500-foot haul from the parking lot just off Granger Road. (I have not clue what the southern side of the lake looks like. I never made it there.)

How to Catch Shad at Fletcher’s Cove in Washington, DC


Folks can land shad various ways. Fly fisherman often feast on them. Standard rod users too. The trick is to put something small and flashy in front of these lust-crazed fish’s eyes. (Shad, you may know, are plankton eaters. They strike lures out of reaction not hunger.

Let me here address landing them on standard gear.

A rig of split-shot and a spoon or a shad dart and a spoon is very effective—from the shore and a boat. See here for more details. In simplest fashion, tie a shad/herring spoon at the end of your line. Then 18-24 inches above add weight, either in the form of splitshot sinkers) or a shad dart. Continue reading

My first shad of 2019, caught on March 16

Kosar shad 03-16-2019.jpgI saw a post from uber angler Alex Binsted on Friday, April 15—he had caught a shad near Fletcher’s Cove. I contactd a fishy friend and learned that his son had been on with Binstead and also had bagged a shad. A check of the water temperature showed me the time had come—the Potomac was 50-51 degrees. That’s the temperature to start chucking for shad, and the perch who often can be found with them.

So there I was at 7:30am in the brisk morning air (mid-40s, 15mph cool wind), right after sunrise. It took half an hour, but then the hit came—a load on the big Nungesser spoon. It took maybe 30 seconds to get the fish in, who ran left and right and leapt out of the water. It was a beautiful fish, around 17 inches, and thick. I got the spoon hook out of the top of its mouth and soon it was rocketing back into the depths.

How to Catch Trout at Lake Cook in Alexandria, Virginia

Kosar rainbow trout 03-2019Lake Cook (directions here), also called Cook Lake, is little lake in Alexandria. It’s all of four acres, but is stocked in the winter with rainbow trout and has channel catfish. (You can check the Virginia government’s stocking schedule here.)

There’s a small parking lot next to it, and Cameron Run —which is fishable— is across the street. All of which makes Cook Lake and easy-to-fish experience. I’ve hauled three young kids there without any trouble. All of them caught trout.

The lake appears to get perhaps 15 foot deep. Trout, loving cool dark waters, tend to hole up in the middle of the lake. Conveniently, there are two fishing platforms that enable long casts to the lake’s center. That said, trout can be found all over the lake (after a stocking), and you can wander anywhere about Lake Cook’s perimeter and cast with ease.

Continue reading