How to Catch Shad at Fletcher’s Cove in Washington, DC


Folks can land shad various ways. Fly fisherman often feast on them. Standard rod users too. The trick is to put something small and flashy in front of these lust-crazed fish’s eyes. (Shad, you may know, are plankton eaters. They strike lures out of reaction not hunger.

Let me here address landing them on standard gear.

A rig of split-shot and a spoon or a shad dart and a spoon is very effective—from the shore and a boat. See here for more details. In simplest fashion, tie a shad/herring spoon at the end of your line. Then 18-24 inches above add weight, either in the form of splitshot sinkers) or a shad dart. Continue reading

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More fishing at Lock 3 in Akron, Ohio


We saw fish in the canal every visit we made to Lock 3 in downtown Akron, Ohio. In summer, they are there. (Not so in winter—the shallow water is too cold.)

We’ve caught largemouths, little catfish, rock bass, sunfish, and bluegill. Here you see us contend with panfish who were skittish. But, with a little cunning we quickly scored one.

For more info on this fishing hole, see my previous Lock 3 video and blogpost.

Lake Medina Surprises Me with a 30″ Northern Pike

Lake Medina is a sizable, beautiful lake where you do not need a fishing license to enjoy its waters. The water is clear, the shored are rocky, and there’s a huge amount of space to shore fish. Kayaks can be put in on the northern side of the lake — although it is about a 500-foot haul from the parking lot just off Granger Road. (I have not clue what the southern side of the lake looks like. I never made it there.)

When we arrived around 9am, my eyes popped—a couple of largemouth bass a short distance from the shore! And bluegill and other panfish immediately began hitting worm on bobber.

Continue reading

Fishing for Snapper (Baby Bluefish) in East Hampton, New York on August 16, 18, and 19, 2016

Fishing for snapper at Louse Point in East Hampton was a blast. It is a tiny spit of land—the road literally ends there. A parking permit from East Hampton is required to park there (there is room for maybe 8 cars), but early in the mornings the city didn;t seem to be patrolling the area.

Every day we caught fish—the hot time was between 8am and 9am. It didn’t matter if it was cloudy and lightly drizzling or sunny. Our first day we got maybe 5 fish in 2 hours; the other days we had 12 and 20 fish in 3 hours.

Thanks to the Tackle Shop (575 Montauk Hwy, Amagansett, NY 11930), we had exactly what we needed to succeed. We took our lightweight 5.6 spincast Zebco and other light rods (with 4 to 10 pound monofilament) and added conic, styrofoam, bobbered rigs with long-shanked small hooks and frozen 3-inch Regal Minnows. There was about 24 inches between the hook and bead/bobber.

Kosar snapper rig 08-16-2016.jpg

Regal Fishing Frozen Minnows 08-2016.jpg

We would cast from 20 to 50 feet out, and pretty quickly snapper would hammer the minnows. Rigging the hook through the eye and into the back of the minnow worked best—snapper tore at the bait crazily, often ripping half off without touching the hook.

Kosar Snapper 08-18-2016.jpg

We swapped on GULP! small minnows, which are made of a rubbery material, and those also got attacked and held up great. When the fish got a bit less excited for eats, slow drawing the bait in elicited strikes. Nearly all the snapper were between 5 and 11 inches, but we also pulled in a Porgy (see below) and a tiny sea robin, which nabbed the bait off the bottom when the rig floated close to shore.

Kosar Porgy 08-16-2016.jpg