Fishing for Striped Bass in Montauk, New York on August 17, 2016

20160817_075919

Ten-year old Robert Kosar with a 40-inch striped bass. Photo credit: Kevin R. Kosar

Doh! I meant to post this entry long ago. Oh, well, better late than never.

What. A. Fishing. Trip.

We left Montauk on a charter boat at about 7am. I made the bad mistake of staying up late the night before, consuming bourbons aplenty, and then eating greasy bacon while on the pitching boat. I had never been seasick previously, or ever had any sort of motion sickness. Live and learn.

Nonetheless, the sun shined and the huge (16-inch?) fake eel lures we used scored one striper after another, along with a few bluefish, out past the famed Montauk Lighthouse. (See the video at the bottom of this post of one of our fish being brought in.)

20160817_100309.jpg

Note the red and yellow artificial eel lures. Photo credit: Kevin R. Kosar.

The fishing style was simple: The mate would let out 100 foot or more line while the boat trolled. Then he handed it to you, who sits in one of the two seats (see photograph below). You do not allow more line to go out, and you sit with the rod across your lap and a firm grip. Keep your hands apart, with one over and one under—like you are holding a hockeystick. Then WHAM! the rod yanks and you then have to reel in the stainless steel line smoothly while distributing it across the whole of the reel (otherwise it can bird nest). My arms felt like jelly after our 3.5 hours out there.

Captain Richard Etzel and his mate were great. Charters can be scheduled by calling 631-668-2914. The website is http://www.breakawaysportfishing.com/. If I make it to Long Island this year, you can be sure I’ll get on this boat again.

20160817_100426

Captain Richard Etzel’s Breakaway. Photo credit: Kevin R. Kosar.

Fishing for Snapper (Baby Bluefish) in East Hampton, New York on August 16, 18, and 19, 2016

Fishing for snapper at Louse Point in East Hampton was a blast. It is a tiny spit of land—the road literally ends there. A parking permit from East Hampton is required to park there (there is room for maybe 8 cars), but early in the mornings the city didn;t seem to be patrolling the area.

Every day we caught fish—the hot time was between 8am and 9am. It didn’t matter if it was cloudy and lightly drizzling or sunny. Our first day we got maybe 5 fish in 2 hours; the other days we had 12 and 20 fish in 3 hours.

Thanks to the Tackle Shop (575 Montauk Hwy, Amagansett, NY 11930), we had exactly what we needed to succeed. We took our lightweight 5.6 spincast Zebco and other light rods (with 4 to 10 pound monofilament) and added conic, styrofoam, bobbered rigs with long-shanked small hooks and frozen 3-inch Regal Minnows. There was about 24 inches between the hook and bead/bobber.

Kosar snapper rig 08-16-2016.jpg

Regal Fishing Frozen Minnows 08-2016.jpg

We would cast from 20 to 50 feet out, and pretty quickly snapper would hammer the minnows. Rigging the hook through the eye and into the back of the minnow worked best—snapper tore at the bait crazily, often ripping half off without touching the hook.

Kosar Snapper 08-18-2016.jpg

We swapped on GULP! small minnows, which are made of a rubbery material, and those also got attacked and held up great. When the fish got a bit less excited for eats, slow drawing the bait in elicited strikes. Nearly all the snapper were between 5 and 11 inches, but we also pulled in a Porgy (see below) and a tiny sea robin, which nabbed the bait off the bottom when the rig floated close to shore.

Kosar Porgy 08-16-2016.jpg

 

Fishing for Stripers In Montauk, New York, August 18, 2014

Striped Bass Bluefish Rig 1 Striped Bass Bluefish Rig 2We caught a Viking boat (65 feet, 200 tons) at 6pm, and got off the boat at midnight. It was about 1.25 hour trip out to the Block Island area. The previous night between 12-6am, the boat fished this same area and had 2.5 quiet hours and then 1.5 hours of many fish. The trip cost $85 per person plus $5 to rent a rod. We fished with live eels that we hooked through the lower and upper lips.

Our rods were 6 feet or so in length and very thick. The rig was a big hook on the end of the line, and a three-leaf clover shaped swivel with a line tied to a fat sinker (#12). The line was incredibly thick monofilament. The aim was to sink the line to the bottom and have the eel swim a couple feet above.

In short, it was a “scratch and claw night” as the captains put it—and very disappointing. Two stripers were caught (one more than 40 inches), along with two bluefish (including a 30+ incher by yours truly) during 4 hours of fishing.

Bluefish

Bluefish

Fluke and Black Sea Bass Fishing in Montauk, New York, August 12, 2014

Fluke Black Sea Bass Viking boatWe left dock a little after 8:30 AM and returned a bit after 12:30 PM. Robert and I were on a 65-foot Viking Fleet boat: http://www.vikingfleet.com/fishing/fishing.asp

The weather was beautiful—70 to 75 degrees, and it had not rained in some days.

We fished for maybe 2.5 hours. We fished 4 places. It was a mediocre day.

Each rod had heavy monofilament, with a decent sized hook on it, and 2.5 feet above was an #8 sinker (some folks had #10 ones, which would have been better with the current.) The model was the same as the catfish rig but with the sinker and hook positions reversed (catfish = sinker at the end with the hook tied above; fluke was hook at the end with the sinker above.)

Fluke Black Sea Bass rig

It was bottom fishing with one dead sand eel (3 inches long and hooked through the eye) and one slice of squid body (5-4 inches). We got a couple of fluke and a sea bass. We had some hits that took our eels. Most folks got only 1 or 2 fish the entire trip. A minority of folks caught 4-7 fish.

Learning experience: Get a spot on the back of the boat where there are fewer rod holders and thus people in whose lines you can get tangled. Folks let out too much line and ended up tangled under the boat with folks on the other side.

Fluke

Fluke

Black Sea Bass

Black Sea Bass