Review: Fishing Lake Medina in Medina Township, Ohio


This drone video will give you a good sense at the size of Lake Medina. (Directions here.)

My video above will give you a good look at the side of the lake nearest the parking lot. We scored a rock bass here, saw plenty of bluegills and sunfish, along with largemouth bass. And I nabbed a northern pike in a very small branch of Rocky River next to the lake. Others report catching channel catfish, crappie, perch, and walleye.

You do not need a fishing license to fish here. The water is clear, the shored are rocky, and there’s a huge amount of space to shore fish.

Canoes and kayaks can be put in on the northern side of the lake — although it is about a 500-foot haul from the parking lot just off Granger Road. (I have not clue what the southern side of the lake looks like. I never made it there.)

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Review: Fishing Ranger Lake in Strongsville, Ohio

They stock this small lake with “largemouth bass, bluegill, pumpkinseed sunfish, crappie, and rainbow trout. The lake is stocked with trout in the winter for ice fishing.”

You can see what fish are in there any particular season at https://www.clevelandmetroparks.com/parks/visit/parks/mill-stream-run-reservation/ranger-lake.

The parking lot (directions here) is small, and this little lake has maybe 100 feet of shore fishing. This looks to me like a good place to put in a canoe or kayak, which you’d need to lug maybe 75 feet.

You will not see any fish caught in this video. We stopped by after an early morning rain and right before another rain—less than ideal conditions for chasing panfish and bass. But, this video will provide you with a view that will help you judge whether you want to visit Ranger Lake. For sure, I’ll return to try it again—with a kayak, and maybe even a fly rod.

Lake Medina Surprises Me with a 30″ Northern Pike

Lake Medina is a sizable, beautiful lake where you do not need a fishing license to enjoy its waters. The water is clear, the shored are rocky, and there’s a huge amount of space to shore fish. Kayaks can be put in on the northern side of the lake — although it is about a 500-foot haul from the parking lot just off Granger Road. (I have not clue what the southern side of the lake looks like. I never made it there.)

When we arrived around 9am, my eyes popped—a couple of largemouth bass a short distance from the shore! And bluegill and other panfish immediately began hitting worm on bobber.

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Fish history: The federal government used to farm fish near the Washington Monument

Fish Washington Monument

Who knew?!

“Starting around 1879, such species as carp, bass and shad were bred by the U.S. Fish Commission in large ponds just west of the Washington Monument….”

“In the summer of 1879, ponds started to be carved out in the area then known as the Potomac Flats. The ponds were the idea of Spencer F. Baird, a former Smithsonian curator — and future Smithsonian secretary — who had been tapped by President Ulysses S. Grant to head the U.S. Fisheries Commission. Baird noted the decrease in fish harvests across the country — due, he believed, to overfishing — and thought a breeding program could help replenish stocks. Such wild species as shad, bass and crappie would eventually be raised in the Washington Monument ponds, but the early attention was focused on a foreign fish: the carp.”

“Floods swamped the ponds in June 1889, sweeping no fewer than 4,000,000 baby fish into the raging waters of the Potomac….”

Read more at https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/the-world-according-to-carp-answer-man-visits-the-fish-ponds-on-the-mall/2017/11/18/93965c98-caf0-11e7-aa96-54417592cf72_story.html?utm_term=.dcff9ce11f2e